Fava Beans And Pancetta Recipe Via Gardentherapy.ca

Broad Beans: Grow it! Eat it!

In this part of the series, Grow it! Eat it!, we will talk about growing, harvesting, cooking, and eating broad beans, nomnomnom.How to Cook Broad Beans via gardentherapy.ca

Grow It!

These garden giants are either sown in the garden in late winter/early spring for a late spring harvest or in the fall for a harvest the following summer. I like to plant them in the fall as I have had the most success with that method and they can be planted when most of the other veggies have been harvested.

Growing Broad Beans

In a nice sunny area of the garden, push the seeds into soil that has had compost added. Cover up with soil and wait for the bean stocks to appear.Harvesting Broad Beans via gardentherapy.ca

Large spongy pods will grow and look quite puffy when the beans are ready to harvest.

Aphids on Broad Beans

Aphids LOVE broad beans but never fear, they aren’t getting the part that you want, the meaty bean inside the pod is safe even if the aphids look like this (ick). Simply wipe them off and shell your beans. Control aphids by hosing them with a strong spray when you are watering the garden. Once dislodged they can’t climb back up and will die.

Eat It!

You may have lost your appetite a little with all this talk of aphids, but once you cook up those beans you will forget all about it. These are seriously one of the most delicious veggies in your garden. That plus the fact they are packed with protein and fiber, you are going to take on anyone who tries to eat your broad beans before you do!Broad Beans and Pancetta Recipe via gardentherapy.ca

Broad Beans with Pancetta

  • shelled broad beans
  • chopped pancetta
  • oilve oil
  • salt & fresh ground pepper to taste

Put all of the ingredients into a pan and sauté on medium low until the pancetta is crispy and the beans are bright green with some caramelization on the outside. Now wait for them to cool a little. Really, you are going to burn your mouth! I know it’s hard to wait but when they are a bit cooler, sit down and enjoy this as a side dish, as if whatever is beside it can compete. Just eat them. Yummy, right?

 

About the Author : StephanieAn artistic gardener aiming to feed the body & soul through an urban potager garden & a community veggie plot in Vancouver.View all posts by Stephanie

  1. Sam
    SamJanuary 17,14

    I’ve already sown a couple of broadbeans inside on the windowsill that will hopefully develop into decent sized plants before going out towards the beggining of march. Bunyards exhibition I think they were.

    What varieties do you recommend to over-winter or will any generally work?

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