Delicate Purple And White Blooms Of Oxalis

Painted Jar Planters + Shamrocks

St. Patrick’s Day typically reminds folks of leprechauns, green beer, Ireland, and shamrocks: the symbol seen on green-felt fedoras. But I’m a plant nerd so I think about the shamrock from a botanical point (and I try not to remember those nights drinking green beer). The symbol of Ireland is the three-leaf old white clover, Trifolium repens, which is common in North America and Europe in grassy areas as well as a pasture crop. I fondly remember summer days as a child searching for a lucky four-leaf clover lying in park grass. While many launch a year long fight to get clover out of their lawns, I’m happy to leave it blooming for the bees and give the lawn a rich green colour.Painted mason jars as vases - this tutorial shows you how to make them glossy and water tight

There are a few other three-leaf herbaceous plants that share the Shamrock moniker my favourite being Oxalis. Native to South America and Africa, this genus of over 500 species are often grown as ornamental plants in home gardens or as houseplants.Purple oxalis in a sage green painted mason jar vase

Oxalis in my garden in tucked in shady woodland areas where it generally hides from the camera. To get a few better shots and really enjoy the beauty of the plant, I picked up a few from the garden centre to use in my spring arrangements.Hanging wire balls with moss and oxalis make a gorgeous spring display

Oxalis regnellii is typically grown in this zone (7-8) as a houseplant due to its vulnerability to frost. Pale lavender to white flowers bloom regularly on healthy plants given plenty of light but away from direct sunlight.Gorgeous oxalis

With Oxalis regnellii ‘Atropurpurea’, the blooms are hardly worth considering when compared to the dark eggplant foliage, often with brighter purple centre leaf margins.delicate purple and white blooms of oxalis

Inspired by the colour palette provided by the two false shamrocks, I created a St. Patty’s day floral arrangement using painted mason jars as planters and as a case for some deep purple tulips.Upcycled Mason Jar Planters hack that keeps them shiny on the outside

 

Painted Mason Jar Tutorial

Materials:

  • Mason jar(s)
  • Latex house paint
  • Craft paint
  • Foam paint brush
  • Flowers / plants

garden therapy

Directions:

This is a simple project that I have seen done with spray paint.  I chose to tint some leftover latex trim paint as : a) I had some, b) I wasn’t keen on the fumes from the spray, and c) I wanted more control over the colour.Materials to paint mason jar vases

Simply mix up the colour that you want by added craft paint into the latex pain in a yogurt container. Mix really well then pour a little into your mason jar.  Use the brush to paint the inside evenly and leave to dry.  Apply a second coat if necessary.  One coat is shown here.How to paint a mason jar so it is shiny

To make into a planter, fit a plastic nursery container containing your plant onto the top.  Ensure there is a little lip holding it on the edge so you can remove it when necessary.

Painted mason jars as vases - this tutorial shows you how to make them glossy and water tight

To make a vase, insert a thin glass vase into the painted jar. Choosing interesting shapes and patterned jars will add even more interest to the project.  I like the simplicity of them on my fireplace mantle where they contrast with the painting.

 Gorgeous flower arrangement with a mix of cut flowers and potted plants #oxalis #tulips #spring

It has also been quite fun to watch the Oxalis “go to sleep” at night, or rather the leaves droop down  as a result of nyctinasty, a plant’s chemical response to the onset of darkness that causes the leaves to tuck in for the night.  It gives these guys a bit of personality which may leave you unconsciously whispering at night as to not disturb them.

You can use this planter any day of the year of course, but there are also many more mason jar projects here: More than 20 Creative Mason Jar Craft Projects and even a few ideas on gardening in jars

About the Author : StephanieAn artistic gardener aiming to feed the body & soul through an urban potager garden & a community veggie plot in Vancouver.View all posts by Stephanie

  1. Caroline @ The Feminist Housewife
    Caroline @ The Feminist HousewifeMarch 10,12

    What a great idea! I have so many mason jars that could be spruced up….

  2. Jennifer@threedogsinagarden
    Jennifer@threedogsinagardenMarch 14,12

    Your shots are terrific. I love the milky look to the finish and color of your mason jar project.

  3. Priscilla
    PriscillaMarch 14,12

    You’re so creative. Cute vases and pretty arrangements. It’s coming up so happy St. Patty’s day!

  4. Linda
    LindaMarch 15,12

    Can you tell us ( your readers) what colors
    you used? I love the light green effect?

    ♥ Linda

  5. Debbie
    DebbieMarch 15,12

    I love the idea of the painted jars. I’m definitely going to try that.

  6. Keeping it Cozy
    Keeping it CozyMarch 16,12

    Thank for sharing this great idea! I love it.

  7. Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co.
    Sharon @ Elizabeth & Co.March 19,12

    Very pretty!

  8. narf7
    narf7April 1,12

    Sorry…I just CAN’T “plant” oxalis! After many years of labouriously grubbing it from every single one of my 900+ pot plants and watching in amazement as it regrew and was waving at me from the window every time I looked out at the sea of oxalis flowers I couldn’t in all faith “plant” it! Pretty leaves but some things need to remain sacred and one of those things is my need for a nemsis named oxalis… (one day….ONE DAY!)

  9. Matt
    MattMarch 18,15

    Very creative, I think it would be a great project to do with the kids! Thanks for the article and great pictures. On the picture of the Oxalis regnellii ‘Atropurpurea, are those the white flowers they produce? I love the color contrast.

  10. Stephanie
    StephanieMarch 19,15

    Thanks Matt! Yes, it would be great to do with kids. And yes, the flowers are white with a hint of purple around the edge of the petals.

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